Putting "m" back in monetary policy
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Putting "m" back in monetary policy

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Monetary policy -- Econometric models,
  • Money supply -- Econometric models

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementEric M. Leeper, Jennifer E. Roush.
GenreEconometric models.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 9552., Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 9552.
ContributionsRoush, Jennifer E., 1970-, National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination46 p. :
Number of Pages46
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17612833M
OCLC/WorldCa51939288

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Get this from a library! Putting 'm' back in monetary policy. [Eric Michael Leeper; Jennifer E Roush; National Bureau of Economic Research.] Genre/Form: Econometric models: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Leeper, Eric M. Putting "M" back in monetary policy. [Washington, D.C.]: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Putting ‘M’ Back in Monetary Policy. By Eric M. Leeper, Jennifer and E. Roush. Abstract. Abstract. Money demand and the stock of money have all but disappeared from monetary policy analyses. In widely used monetary models, the money stock is redundant for determining output and inflation once a path for the real interest rate is given   PUTTING ‘M’ BACK IN MONETARY POLICY ERIC M. LEEPER AND JENNIFER E. ROUSH Abstract. Money demand and the stock of money have all but disappeared from monetary policy analyses. Remarkably, it is more common for empirical work on monetary policy to include commodity prices than to include money. This paper

Putting "M" back in monetary policy. By Eric M. Leeper and Jennifer E. Roush. Abstract. Money demand and the stock of money have all but disappeared from monetary policy analyses. This paper is an empirical contribution to the debate over the role of money in monetary policy analysis. The paper models supply and demand interactions in the CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): Abstract. Money demand and the stock of money have all but disappeared from monetary policy analyses. In widely used monetary models, the money stock is redundant for determining output and inflation once a path for the real interest rate is given. This paper is an empirical contribution to the debate over the role of ?doi= Smets, Frank. “Discussion of ‘Putting “M” Back in Monetary Policy’ by Eric Leeper and Jennifer Roush.” JOURNAL OF MONEY CREDIT AND BANKING – :// CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): NOTE: International Finance Discussion Papers are preliminary materials circulated to stimulate discussion and critical comment. References in publications to International Finance Discussion Papers (other than an acknowledgment that the writer has had access to unpublished material) should be cleared with the ?doi=

  swing, a more active fiscal policy is back in favor. How does fiscal policy work? When policymakers seek to infl uence the economy, they have two main tools at their disposal—monetary policy and fi scal policy. Central banks indirectly target activity by infl uencing the money supply through adjustments to interest rates, bank This book provides a clear overview of the subject and provides clear conclusions. The author's logic is linear and impeccable. The information in this book opens up the doors and pulls back the curtains to the opaque fuzzy center of the monetary system that has been intentionally hidden. This book contains more than interesting  › Books › Business & Money › Economics.   Monetary policy is the process of drafting, announcing, and implementing the plan of actions taken by the central bank, currency board, or other competent monetary authority of a country that   The role of monetary policy doesn’t stop then, but it takes a back seat to supporting fiscal policy. In essence, monetary policy is effective at putting the brakes on an economy, but bad at stimulating an economy, whereas fiscal spending has the opposite ://